Monday, July 11, 2016

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE - ALMOST FROM ARCHAIC GREECE

How do you make a sequel to a movie in which everyone died? The answer, so obvious that you can almost miss it is: You don’t.

In the words of the director Noam Murro, 300: Rise of an Empire is an ‘equal’, and not a prequel or sequel to its epic predecessor ‘300’. This means it happens at the same time! According to Murro, the first movie cleverly fits into it as the missing piece of a jigsaw puzzle, a different perspective of the same time, prompting “Dang! That’s what happens!” from audiences who’ve seen both.
It is the story of the Athenian general Themistokles: a champion who takes on the might of the Persian Navy commanded by the vindictive Artemisia, under Xerxes’ vision, with assistance from the Spartans and shrewd tactics. Covering a lot of ground both historically and literally, the film was shot for over 8 months in Bulgaria with soundstage green screens. The detailing was meticulous and references were numerous - Frank Miller’s yet-to-be-published graphic novel ‘Xerxes’, Persian sculptures, Persian art and architecture, Greek city planning. As Murro remarks, filming and the physical production were cathartically depleting experiences: “When I came back home, everything green had to be removed. Every history book had to be removed, everything having to do with Greeks and ships — with men, for that matter! It took a bit of adjustment, coming back.”
On screen, as a cinematic narrative of the Battle of Artemisum and the Battle of Salamis, the movie offers operatic frames with copious amounts of imagination, metrically choreographed fights, exaggerated emotions and magnified expressions. The Aegan Sea is stained crimson with blood, as broad swords clang on metal helmets, creating a kaleidoscope of arresting visuals and arterial splatter!



As a fantasy film about fantasy heroes and villains, it offers its fans the desire and opportunity to explore the experience on a more tangible plane through replicas and props - the Spartan’s cape, Sullivan Stapleton’s sword, Eva Green’s costumes, the vintage helmets, etc.
Museum Replicas’ 300: Rise of an Empire collectibles are designed to be accurate and long-lasting replicas. With contributions from Frank Miller, MRL offers over fifteen products of all kinds, some of which are simply exquisite. This includes the Spartan shield, made of stainless steel and finished with aged brass to feel like history in your hands. The overall make is incredibly sturdy and the leather hand hold can rouse the warrior instincts of anyone wielding it. Of course, everyone wants to own a sword and Museum Replicas offers you a choice between the Sword of Calisto and the Sword of Themistokles. You may resonate with the impulsive Calisto or the insightful Themistokles and both the swords comprise of a high-carbon steel blade with an antique bronze finish. They make excellent functional swords, as well as wall hangers. For those looking forward to put together the complete look of Themistokles, the 300 range has it all. Another terrific product is Artemisia’s dagger which, like her personality, is hauntingly strong and beautiful. Browse the complete collection to become your own hero!


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